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Chemical & Biomedical Systems

Systems Engineering is an appropriate major for students who intend to pursue graduate studies in biomedical engineering. Many of our systems engineering faculty and graduate students are currently involved in joint research projects with faculty in the Biomedical Engineering Department and in the Medical School, working on such issues as medical decision-aiding and physiological systems modeling. Because of lengthy course sequences in the physical and biological sciences required for biomedical systems engineering, students concentrating in this area are urged to contact Biomedical Engineering faculty for advice in developing not only application sequences, but also in developing their entire plan of study. Your systems engineering faculty advisor would be happy to help you establish these contacts. If you are considering this application area, you should begin preparing your plan of study in your first year in order to avoid lost time and course overloads. You also may want to learn more about the undergraduate Engineering Science degree program. 

Courses in [brackets] are pre-requisites. Because pre-requisites for a course can change, students are advised to use the bracketed courses only as guides; confirm the current pre-requisite structure on the
Undergraduate Record.

BME 2101 Physiology I for Engineers [BIOL 2010, CHEM 1610, PHYS 1425, APMA 1110 or similar, or instructor permission]
BME 2102 Physiology II [BME 2101, or instructor permission]
BME 2104 Cell and Molecular Biology for Engineers [CHEM 1610 or instructor permission]
BME 2220 Biomechanics [APMA 2130, BME 2101, or instructor permission]
BME 3310 Biomedical Systems Analysis and Design [APMA 2130, CS 1110 or instructor permission]
BME 4280 Motion Biomechanics [BME 2101, BME 2220 or instructor permission]
BME 4414 Biomaterials [BME 2104 and BME 2220 or equivalent]
BME 4550 Special Topics: Biomedical Engineering [third- or fourth-year standing, and instructor permission
BME 4641 Bioelectricity [BME 3310 or ECE 2630, BME 2101, or instructor permission]
BME 4783 Medical Image Modalities [BME 3310 or ECE 3750, or instructor permission]
BME 4784 Medical Image Analysis [BME 3310, ECE 3750, or instructor permission]
BME 4806 Biomedical Applications of Genetic Engineering [BME 2101, BME 2102, and BME 2104, or CHE 2246, and third- or fourth-year standing, and instructor permission]

In addition, all Chemical Engineering (CHE) courses at the 2000, 3000 and 4000 levels are approved.

Civil, Environmental & Infrastructure Systems

This sequence addresses the sustainable utilization of natural resources for the delivery of essential services, ranging from clean air and water resources to renewable energy and transportation. Among the complex issues studied in this sequence are the lifecycle benefits, costs, and risks of the relevant systems; the engineering, economic, and policy considerations in the design, implementation, management, and evolution of these systems; as well as the sustainability of civil, environmental, and infrastructure (CEI) systems with respect to their impacts on air, water, land, materials and energy use, and on ecosystems. The sequence also includes study of the optimal production and consumption of infrastructure related goods and services, and analysis of the relevant behavior of firms and industry, under different market structures and regulatory regimes. This application area is recommended for those who intend to follow a career in public policy, research and development or consulting with emphasis on civil, energy, environmental and infrastructure issues. The courses listed below will give the student applied knowledge of natural resources management, as well as the economic and political implications of different policy prescriptions. Courses in engineering, applied mathematics, or college mathematics may be substituted with the advisor's approval.

Courses in [brackets] are pre-requisites. Because pre-requisites for a course can change, students are advised to use the bracketed courses only as guides. Please confirm the current pre-requisite structure on the 
Undergraduate Record.

ARCH 2150 Global Sustainability

CE 2100 Intro to Environmental Engineering [CHEM 1410 or CHEM 1610 and CE major/minor or instructor permission]
CE 3000 Civil Engineering Systems Analysis [CE 2010]
CE 3210 Fluid Mechanics [CE2300 or equivalent and CE major/minor]
CE 3212 Fluid Mechanics Lab [CE 2300; co-requisite CE 3210 or instructor permission and CE major/minor]
CE 3220 Water Resources Engineering [CE 3210]
CE 3400 Transportation Infrastructure Design [CE 2010 and Third-year standing in CE or instructor permission and co-requisite CE 3402]
CE 4000 Construction Engineering [CE 2010 and CE major/minor] (cannot recieve credit for both CE 4000 and ARCH 5340)
CE 4100 Water Chemistry for Environmental Engineering 
[CHEM 1610 and 1611] (taught concurrently with CE 6220)
CE 4110 Environmental Systems Modeling and Management
CE 4200 Ground-water Hydrology and Contaminant Transport[CE 2210, CE 3210 or equivalent]
CE 4400 Traffic Operations (taught concurrently with CE 6400)
[CE 3400]
CE 4410 Introduction to Transportation Planning (taught concurrently with CE 6410)[CE3400]
CE 4800 Computational Methods in Civil Engineering
[4th-year standing]
CE 4810 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
CE 5240 Ground-Water Hydrology and Contaminant Transport [CE 2210, CE 3200, or equivalent]

COMM 3880 Global Sustainability

ECE 3250 Electromechanical Energy Conversion [ECE 2660, 3209, or PHYS 2415]

ECON 4180 Regulating Infrastructure [ECON 3010 or 3110]
ECON 4190 Industrial Organization [ECON 3010 or 3110]
ECON 4430 Environmental Economics [ECON 3010 or 3110]

EVSC 3020 GIS Methods [The equivalent of the College natural science/mathematics and social science area requirements]

GSVS 2150 Global Sustainability

MAE 2100 Thermodynamics [APMA 1110]
MAE 3120 Thermal Systems Analysis [MAE 2100]
MAE 3140 Elements of Heat and Mass Transfer [MAE 3210]
MAE 4630 Energy Systems Design 1 [MAE 3140]

PLAN 3060 Land, Law and the Environment
PLAN 3860 Cities and Nature
PLAN 4040 Planning in Government
PLAN 5600 Land Use and Growth Management
PLAN 5810 Sustainable Communities
PLAN 5890 Sustainable International Development

STS 3500/SYS 4502/GSGS 3559 Sustainability and Human Needs (offered through the Morven Summer Institute)

SYS 4044 Economics of Engineering Systems [ECON 2010 and APMA 3100 or 3110]

Control & Mechanical Systems 

Many practicing systems engineers were formally trained as electrical and mechanical engineers, with concentrations in control theory and control engineering. Concentrations in control systems are required in many undergraduate systems engineering programs at other universities. This application area provides an excellent conceptual framework both for professional practice and advanced study. Courses in engineering, computer science, applied mathematics, or college mathematics may be substituted with your advisor's approval.
Courses in [brackets] are pre-requisites. Because pre-requisites for a course can change, students are advised to use the bracketed courses only as guides; confirm the current pre-requisite structure on the 
Undergraduate Record.

ECE 3750 Signals and Systems I [ECE 2630 and APMA 2130]
ECE 4750 Digital Signal Processing [ECE 3750]
ECE 4850 Linear Control Systems [ECE 3750 or instructor permission]
ECE 4855 Control Laboratory [co-req. ECE 4850]
ECE 4860 Digital Control Systems [ECE 4850 or instructor permission]
ECE 5750 Digital Signal Processing [ECE 3750 and ECE 3760 or equivalent]


MAE 2310 Strength of Materials [MAE 2300, APMA 2120]
MAE 2320 Dynamics [MAE 2300]
MAE 3710 Mechanical Systems [MAE 2320 and APMA 2130]
MAE 4710 Mechatronics [MAE 2320 and MAE 3810, or instructor permission]
MAE 4730 Introduction to Automatic Controls [MAE 2320 and MAE 3710]
MAE 4740 Mechanical Vibrations [MAE 2320; co-requisite MAE 3710]

MATH 3340 Complex Variables with Applications [MATH 2310]
MATH 4220 Partial Differential Equations and Applied Mathematics [MATH 5210, MATH 3351 recommended] 

SYS 4582 Concepts of Collaborative Autonomy

Design Integration

In many industries, the term "systems engineer" refers to a person responsible for the integration of components into a comprehensive systems design. Many times this person has an undergraduate degree in a non-systems engineering field (e.g., mechanical, aerospace, electrical) and develops the ability to work on integrated systems over years of experience designing within their specific domain.  They are the so-called "T" shaped people, with depth in their discipline and an ability to work across disciplines.  This application sequence focuses on jumpstarting the development of this type of "systems engineer" during an undergraduate program.  To do so, the sequence focuses on fundamentals in electrical, mechanical, and information systems and exposing students to integration-related issues such as systems architectures, interdependent decisions, among teams, prototyping and testing.  This sequence is directly tied to the Technology Leaders Program and the Design Integration Minor.

SYS 2048 Introduction to Elecromechanical Systems [ECE 2630, ECE/CS 2330, or MAE 2000; co-requisite APMA 2130, or instructor permission]
SYS 3048 Integrated Systems Design [SYS 2001, SYS 2048 and MAE 4710, or instructor permission]

ECE 2330 Digital Logic Design (Cross-listed as CS 2330)
ECE 2630 ECE Fundamental I [APMA 1110]

MAE 4710 Mechatronics [MAE 2320 and MAE 3810, or instructor permission]

Economic Systems

The complexity of economic systems is increasingly being modeled and resolved using systems engineering techniques. Examples of such activity include macroeconomic forecasting and policy analysis, the economics of poverty and development, credit scoring by credit agencies and financial institutions, and security analysis on Wall Street. This application area is an excellent choice for those who intend to work in economics and finance-oriented areas, or who intend to pursue graduate studies in engineering- economic systems, business administration and finance, and economics. All courses taught by the Economics Department in the College numbered ECON 3xxx and higher qualify for the application sequence, except ECON 3710. ECON 2010 and 2020 should be taken as general education electives.  Beyond ECON classes, the following classes can count for the Economics Application Sequence:

SYS 4000 Financial Aspects of Engineering
SYS 4044 Economics of Engineering Systems [ECON 2010 and APMA 3100 or APMA 3110, or instructor permission]
SYS 4581 Financial Engineering

Electrical and Computer Engineering Systems

The overlap between systems engineering and electrical and computer engineering is longstanding and is a sought after combination of knowledge in industry. While ECE students have strong skills in designing electrical and computer components, all interesting applications of such components require their integration into systems. As a systems major, one of your core knowledge areas will be negotiating trade-offs associated with integrating components into a system. By pursuing this application area, you can focus such integration skills and knowledge on electrical and computer systems. All ECE courses at the 2000, 3000, or 4000 level, with the exception of ECE 2066, are approved for this application sequence.

Human Factors

The goal of human factors is to promote productive interaction between people and the systems they use. Students need to understand how human cognitive and sensory abilities impact system operation. Given knowledge of the human, students learn to design and construct tools (user interfaces, physical equipment, and training interventions) to support human performance. Such tools may be designed to leverage the strengths of both humans and machines for control of semi-automated processes.
The following courses qualify for the application sequence:

Students are advised to check for course pre-requisites on the
Undergraduate Record.

BME 2101 Physiology I for Engineers [BIOL 2010, CHEM 1610, PHYS 1425, APMA 1110 or similar, or instructor permission]
BME 2220 Biomechanics [APMA 2130, BME 2101, or instructor permission]
BME 2315 Computational Biomedical Engineering [APMA 2120 and CS 1110; recommended co-requisite APMA 2130]
BME 3310 Biomedical Systems Analysis and Design [APMA 2130, CS 1110 or instructor permission]
BME 4280 Muscle Motion Biomechanics [BME 2102, 2220, or instructor permission]

COMM 3020 Behavioral Issues in Marketing and Management (this course is part of the Mcintyre Integrated Core Curriculum which is strictly restricted to Commerce students only.  Students have transferred credit in for this topic, however, from abroad)

CS 3205 HCI in Software Development [CS 2110, 2220 with a grade of C- or higher]
CS 4710 Artificial Intelligence [CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher]
CS 4810 Intro to Computer Graphics [CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher]

EDIS 3020 The Exceptional Learner [Instructor permission]

KINE 2220 Motor Development
KINE 3600 Musculoskeletal Anatomy
KINE 3620 Biomechanics/Motor Control of Human Movement

PHIL 2330 Computers, Minds and Brains
PHIL 2420 Intro To Symbolic Logic
PHIL 3320 Epistemology

PHYS 3040 Physics of the Human Body [a semester of calculus and PHYS 2010 or PHYS 1425 & 2415 or PHYS 1710, 1620 & 2610; Co-requisite PHYS 2020 or PHYS 2415 or PHYS 1720 or instructor permission]

PSYC 2100 Introduction to Learning
PSYC 2150 Introduction to Cognition
PSYC 2200 A Survey of the Neural Basis of Behavior
PSYC 2220 Principles of Psychobiology
PSYC 2300 Introduction to Perception [Mathematics at least up to trigonometry recommended]
PSYC 3005 Research Methods and Data Analysis I [One of the following MATH courses with a grade of C- or higher: MATH 1190, 1210, 1212, 1220, 1310, 1320, APMA 1090 or 1110 are required with a grade of C- or higher]
PSYC
 3006 Research Methods and Data Analysis II [PSYC 3005 and 4005 with a grade of C or higher; and Psychology Major/Minor or Cognitive Science Major]
PSYC 4150 Cognitive Processes [12 credits of psychology or instructor permission]
PSYC 4180 Invention and Design [ENWR 1510 or STS 1010 or instructor permission]
PSYC 4200 Neural Mechanisms of Behavior [PSYC 2200 or 2220, 
Psychology, Cognitive Science, or Neuroscience major or instructor permission; prerequisite, or co-requisite PSYC 3210 recommended]

STAT 3130 Design and Analysis of Sample Surveys
 
STS 2880 Invention and Design [STS 1500 or equivalent]

SYS 4024 User Experience Design [SYS 3023 or CS 3205 or instructor permission]
SYS 4036 Design of Experiments [APMA 3120]

Mathematical Systems

A knowledge of applied mathematics is perhaps the best asset a systems engineer can acquire as an undergraduate. Applied mathematics in many ways forms the core of systems science and the tool of systems engineers. The skills of formulating and analyzing mathematical models of real-world problems open a range of technically challenging and intellectually stimulating career paths in private enterprises, government agencies, consulting firms, and research institutes. The versatility in mathematical reasoning and deduction offers also an excellent preparation for all sorts of graduate studies. Mathematically-focused courses in engineering, computer science, economics, or the sciences may be substituted with your advisor's approval.

Students are advised to check for courses pre-requisites on the Undergraduate Record.

APMA 3140 Applied Partial Differential Equations [APMA 2120 and 2130 or equivalents]
APMA 5070 Numerical Methods [Two years of college mathematics, including some linear algebra and differential equations, and the ability to  write computer programs in any language]

CS/APMA 2102 Discrete Mathematics I [APMA 1110 and CS 1110, 1111, 1112 or 1120 with a grade of C- or higher]
CS 3102 Theory of Computation [CS 2102 and CS 2210 both with grades of C- or higher]

MATH 3310 Basic Real Analysis [MATH 1320]
MATH 3340 Complex Variables with Applications [MATH 2310]
MATH 3351 Elementary Linear Algebra [MATH 1320]
MATH 3354 Survey of Algebra [MATH 1320 or equivalent]
MATH 4040 Discrete Mathematics [MATH 3354 or instructor permission]
MATH 4110 Introduction to Stochastic Processes [MATH 3100 or APMA 3100, and a knowledge of matrix algebra]
MATH 4140 Mathematics of Derivative Securities 
[MATH 3100 or APMA 3100, and a knowledge of matrix algebra]
MATH 4220 Partial Differential Equations and Applied Mathematics [MATH 4210; MATH 3351 recommended]
MATH 4250 Differential Equations and Dynamical Systems [MATH 3310 or MATH 4310 and MATH 3351 or APMA 3080]

MATH 4300 Elementary Numerical Analysis [MATH 3250 and computer proficiency]
MATH 4310 Introduction to Real Analysis [MATH 3310]
MATH 4452 Algebraic Coding Theory [MATH 3351 and 3354, or instructor permission]
MATH 4651 Advanced Linear Algebra [MATH 3351 or APMA 3080]
MATH 4652 Intro to Abstract Algebra [MATH 3351 or 5651]
MATH 4750 Introduction to Knot Theory [MATH 3354 or instructor permission]MATH 5653 Number Theory [MATH 3354 or instructor permission]
MATH 5330 Advanced Multivariate Calculus [Calculus III (either MATH 2310 or MATH 2315) and one of MATH 5310 or MATH 5770]
MATH 5653 Number Theory [MATH 3354 or instructor permission]

STAT 3130 Design and Analysis of Sample Surveys
STAT 3480 Nonparametric and Rank-Based Statistics [STAT 1120 or STAT 2120]
STAT 4160 Experimental Design [STAT 3080 and 3220]
STAT 4170 Financial Time Series and Forecasting [STAT 3118 or MATH 3100 or APMA 3100 and STAT 3220 or STAT 5120 or ECON 3720]
STAT 4210 Big Data Tools [STAT 3430 or 3240 or 3250 or CS 1010 or 1020 or 1110 or 1111 or 1112 or 1113 or 1120]
STAT 4220 Applied Analytics for Business [STAT 3240 or 3250 or 3430 or CS 1010 or 1020 or 1110 or 1111 or 1112 or 1113 or 1120]
STAT 4630 Statistical Machine Learning [STAT 3220, STAT 5120 or ECON 3720 and previous experience with R]
STAT 5140 Survival Analysis and Reliability Theory [MATH 3120 or 5100, or instructor permission; co-req: STAT 5980]
STAT 5150 Actuarial Statistics [MATH 3120 or 5100, or instructor permission]
STAT 5170 Applied Time Series [MATH 3120 or 5100, or instructor permission; co-req: STAT 5980]
STAT 5330 Data Mining [Previous or concurrent enrollment in STAT 5120 or STAT 6120]
STAT 5340 Bootstrap and Other Resampling Methods
STAT 5350 Applied Causal Inference
STAT 5390 Exploratory Data Analysis [A previous statistics cours; previous exposure to calculus and linear algebra recommended]
STAT 6130 Applied Multivariate Statistics [MATH3351 and 3120 or 5100, or instructor permission]
STAT 6160 Experimental Design [MATH 3120 or 5100, or instructor permission; co-req: STAT 5980]
STAT 6190 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics [Graduate standing in Statistics or instructor permission]

Military 

NASC 2100 Leadership and Management
NASC 2200 Navigation
NASC 3100 Naval Ship Systems I
NASC 3200 Naval Ship Systems II
NASC 4100 Naval Operation and Seamanship [NASC 2200 and 2210]
NASC 4200 Leadership and Ethics [NASC 2100]

AIRS 1100 Foundations of U.S. Air Force [Co-requisite: AIRS 100]
AIRS 1200 Foundations of U.S.Air Force [Co-requisite: AIRS 100]
AIRS 2100 Evolution of Air and Space Power [Co-requisite AIRS 100]
AIRS 2200 Evolution of Air and Space Power [Co-requisite AIRS 100]
AIRS 3100 Air Force Leadership and Management [Co-requisite AIRS 100]
AIRS 3200 Air Force Leadership and Management [Officer Field Training attendance; co-requisite: AIRS 100]
AIRS 4100 National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty [AIRS 3100 and/or 3200; co-requisite: AIRS 100]

Software and Information Systems

As a practicing systems engineer, you will be expected to have good programming skills and a basic understanding of computer systems. Much of the active research of our systems engineering faculty and graduate students is directly or indirectly concerned with the design and implementation of efficient and effective algorithms and software systems for specific optimization, simulation, and problem-solving applications. This application area is an excellent choice if you plan to practice systems engineering, pursue graduate studies in engineering or management, or if you just enjoy hacking. Courses in engineering, applied mathematics, or college mathematics may be substituted with your advisor's approval. (NOTE: All CS courses require that prerequisites be completed with a C- grade or better.)

Courses in [brackets] are pre-requisites. Because pre-requisites for a course can change, students are advised to use the bracketed courses only as guides; confirm the current pre-requisite structure on the 
Undergraduate Record.

CE 4810 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

CS/APMA 2102 Discrete Mathematics I [CS 1110 or 1111, 1112 or 1120 and APMA 1110 with a grade of C- or higher]
CS 2150 Program and Data Representation [CS 2102 and either CS 2110 or CS 2220 with grades of C- or higher]
CS/ECE 2330 Digital Logic Design
CS/APMA 3102 Theory of Computation [APMA 2102 and either CS 2110 or CS 2220 all with grades of C or higher]
CS 3240 Advanced Software Development Techniques [CS 2160 with a grade of C- or higher]
CS 3330 Computer Architecture [CS 2110 or CS 2220 with a grade of C- or higher, and CS 2330 with a grade of C- or higher]
CS 4102 Algorithms [CS 2102 and CS 2150 with grades of C- or higher and APMA 1090 or MATH 1210 or MATH 1310]
CS 4240 Principles of Software Design [2150 with grade of C- or higher]
CS 4414 Operating Systems [CS 2150 and CS 3330 or ECE 3430 with with grades of C- or higher]
CS/ECE 4434 Dependable Computing Systems [ECE 3430 or CS 3330 and APMA 3100 or APMA 3110]
CS/ECE 4457 Computer Networks [CS or ECE 3430]
CS 4458 Internet Engineering [CS 4457 with a grade of C- or higher]
CS 4610 Programming Languages [CS 2150 with a grade of C- or]
CS 4750 Database Systems [CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher]
CS 4753 Electronic Commerce Technologies [CS 2150]
CS 5787 Security in Information Systems [CS 3240 and either CS/ECE 4457 or CS 4414 or instructor permission]

DS 4559/6001 Practice of Data Science [instructor permission]

ECE 4435 Computer Architecture and Design [ECE 3430]

Knowledge and skills related to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are increasing in popularity and demand both in research, business, and the technical community. These courses qualify for the application sequence, but do not qualify as technical electives.

EVSC 3020 GIS Methods
EVSC 4070 Advanced GIS [An introductory GIS
 course]

SYS 2054 Systems Case Studies (counts for Argentina program only)
SYS 3054 Systems Case Studies (counts for Argentina program only)

Students concentrating in computer and information systems and seeking a specialty in business-oriented information systems may elect the following application courses from the Commerce School. These courses qualify for the application sequence, but do not qualify as technical electives.

Note that the availability of COMM courses is not guaranteed

COMM 3020 Behavioral Issues in Marketing and Management [Third-year Commerce standing]
COMM 3200 Project Management [Undergraduate Commerce or instructor permission]
COMM 3220 Database Management Systems and Business Intelligence [Undergraduate Commerce or instructor permission]
COMM 4230 Information Technology in Finance
COMM 4240 Electronic Commerce and Web Analytics [Fourth-year Commerce standing or instructor permission]
COMM 4250 Innovation [Fourth-year Commerce standing or instructor permission]
COMM 4260 Business Analytics 
[Fourth-year Commerce standing or instructor permission]
COMM 4293 Global Commerce Immersion: IT Project Practicum, (UVa in Argentina only)

Student Designed Application Sequence

Students who want to pursue a Student-Design Application Sequence must submit the proposal (requirements outlined below) by December 15 of their third year.  No Student-Design Application Sequences will be accepted after this time.

If you want to design your own area of concentration, these are the steps you should follow:    

    Prepare a preliminary proposal. This proposal should be approximately one page long and should include:  

  • A brief narrative defining the concentration area and describing its importance and relevance to systems engineering.
  • A list of primary and alternate courses that constitute a program of study in this concentration area.
  • A brief description of your educational objectives and career plans and how these are related to the concentration area you propose. Indicate any special background or preparation that may motivate your choice.       
              
    Discuss the preliminary proposal with your faculty advisor. If your faculty advisor approves of the concentration area, s/he will work with you in preparing your final proposal.    

In making its decision, the Undergraduate Studies Committee will address the following points: 

  • The appropriateness of the concentration area as a cohesive theme of professional study and its furtherance of the student's individual educational goals and career objectives.
  • The maturity, motivation, and academic ability of the individual student.